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Assistant Professor
Anthropology
College of Arts and Sciences
Courses Taught 
ANTH 109 - FYE: Skeletons in Chicago Closets
ANTH 215 - Human Origins: Introduction to Biological Anthropology
ANTH 327 - Dental Anthropology
ANTH 329 - Evolution of the Human Diet
ANTH 339 - Paleoanthropology: Fossil Record of Human Evolution
ANTH 355 - WIP: History of Anthropology
ANTH 356 - Human Variation
WGS 317 - Science and the Gendered Body
Research Interests 
My research focuses on the paleobiology and biogeography of the extinct South American primates with a special emphasis on the Caribbean region. I am particularly interested in understanding how the modern primate radiation developed in the diverse environments of the new world from the Miocene to the present. Due to the vagaries of the fossil record, teeth are often the only evidence of a mammalian species recovered in the field, but these fossils can provide a valuable window into the paleobiology and phylogenetic relationships of the extinct animal. To analyze how a dentition is uniquely adapted to an animal's dietary profile, I use high-resolution laser scanning to create virtual models of teeth, on which data are collected. Using three-dimensional models, I can analyze how teeth fit together to process food, can study how wear patterns differ across primates of different dietary guilds, and can explore the relationship between an animal's phylogenetic history and functional morphology. Conducting these analyses on the dentition of extant primates of known dietary profile also allows for the possibility of dietary reconstruction in extinct forms through analogy. In addition to my laboratory-based analyses of primate teeth, I also conduct paleontological fieldwork in the Dominican Republic and in Colombia. I am currently accepting undergraduate research students who are interested in conducting projects related to dentition and feeding, three-dimensional modeling, and Caribbean and South American paleontology.
Education 

Ph.D. Physical Anthropology, Graduate Center, City University of New York, 2011

M. Phil. Physical Anthropology, Graduate Center, City University of New York, 2007

B.A. Anthropology and Music, Barnard College, Columbia University, 2002

Selected Publications 

Allen, K.L., Cooke, S.B., Gonzales, L.A., Kay, R.F. 2015. Dietary Inference from Upper and Lower Molar Morphology in Platyrrhine Primates. PLoS ONE 10 (3): e0118732. doi:10.1371/journal.pone.0118732

Cooke, S.B., Terhune, C.E. 2015. Form, function, and geometric morphometrics. The Anatomical Record 298: 5-28.

Terhune, C.E., Cooke, S.B., Otárolo-Castillo, E. 2015. Form and function in the platyrrhine skull: A three-dimensional analysis of dental and TMJ morphology. The Anatomical Record 298: 29-47.

Winchester, J.M., Boyer, D.M., St. Clair, E.M., Gosselin-Ildari, A., Cooke, S.B., Ledogar, J. 2014. Dental topography of platyrrhines and prosimians: convergences and contrasts. American Journal of Physical Anthropology 153: 29-44.

Rosenberger A.L., Klukkert, Z. Cooke, S.B., Rímoli, R. Rethinking Antillothrix: The mandible and its implications. 2013. American Journal of Primatology 75: 825-836.

Velazco, P.M., O’Neill, H., Gunnell, G.F., Cooke, S.B., Rosenberger, A.L., Rímoli, R., Simmons, N.B. 2013. Quaternary bat diversity in the Dominican Republic. American Museum Novitates 3779: 1-20.

Cooke, S.B. 2011. Paleodiet of extinct platyrrhines with emphasis on the Caribbean forms: three-dimensional geometric morphometrics of mandibular second molars. 2011. The Anatomical Record 294: 2073-2091.

Rosenberger, A.L., Halenar, L.B., Cooke, S.B. 2011. The making of platyrrhine semi-folivores: models for the evolution of folivory in primates. The Anatomical Record 294: 2112-2130.

Cooke, S.B., Rosenberger, A.L., Turvey, S. 2011. An extinct monkey from Haiti and the origins of the Greater Antillean primates. Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences 108: 2699-2704.

Rosenberger, A.L., Cooke, S.B., Rímoli, R., Ni, X., Cardosa, L. 2011. First skull of Antillothrix bernensis, an extinct relict platyrrhine from the Dominican Republic. Proceedings of the Royal Academy of Sciences, B 278(1702): 67-74.

Rosenberger, A.L., Tejedor, M., Cooke, S.B., Pekar, S. 2009. Platyrrhine ecophylogenetics in space and time. In: Garber, P., Estrada, A., Bicca-Marques, J.C., Heymann, E.W., Strier, K.B.,  (Eds.) South American primates: comparative perspectives in the study of behavior, ecology and conservation. Springer, New York, pp. 85-122.

Arts and Sciences

Faculty Profiles

T (773) 442-5860

lcdavis@neiu.edu

Faculty Profiles

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