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Assistant Professor
Sociology and Women's and Gender Studies
College of Arts and Sciences
Courses Taught 
SOC 100: Introduction to Sociology
SOC 212: Introduction to Social Statistics
SOC 331: Military Sociology
SOC 335: Sociological Theory
SOC 332: Sociology of Education
SOC 340: Sociology of Sexualities
Research Interests 
Informed by my broad interest in social inequality, my areas of specialization within sociology include: education, militarization, and sexualities. Current trends in public education include the militarization, privatization, and corporatization of U.S. schools. Coupled with neoliberal ideals and policies, these trends are presented as a solution for the failing U.S. public education system. Unfortunately, most of these failing schools are underfunded, overcrowded, and located in poor and working-class communities of color and few students who attend these schools “make it.” The bulk of my research, to date, has focused on the nexus between militarization, neoliberalism, and the U.S. public education system and how these macro-level social phenomena influence and shape micro-level processes. However, given the current social dialogue of LGBTQ justice, discrimination, and prejudice, I find that the complex web of social interactions between education, militarization, and political economy provides a rich terrain for exploring the social politics of sexualities.
Education 

Ph.D., Sociology, 2009, University of California, Riverside

M.A., Sociology, 2005, University of California, Riverside

B.A., Sociology, 2000, Boise State University
 

Selected Publications 

Johnson, Brooke. 2014. Culture and Structure at a Military Charter School: From School Ground to Battle Ground. New York: Palgrave Macmillan.

Johnson, Brooke. 2010. "A Few Good Boys: Masculinity at a Military-style Charter School." Men and Masculinities 12(5):575-596.

Aguirre, Jr., Adalberto and Brooke Johnson. 2005. "Militarizing Youth in Public Education: Observations from a Military-Style Charter School." Social Justice 32(3):148-162.

Arts and Sciences

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