by George Batson
Produced by special arrangement with Samuel French, Inc.
July & August 2002

The House on the Cliff overlooks one of the Great Lakes. Years ago, an excursion boat sank in a storm and it’s said the lake is haunted. The house’s occupants include a young, lovely heiress, Ellen Clayton, currently confined to a wheelchair; her coolly    beautiful stepmother; and a strict housekeeper. Then Nurse Pepper arrives, a cheerful, curious person eager to put things in order. And there’s the substitute doctor who believes Ellen can walk again – and soon. It all begins with a sudden violent murder and ends with a chilling, surprising climax.

Cast (in order of appearance)
DR. PAUL LANE.................... MATT STEVENS
ELLEN CLAYTON.................... MARIA STEPHENS
KAREN CLAYTON.................... ALEXIS GLADD
JENNY............................ ROSEMARY BRADLEY
MISS PEPPER...................... CHELSEY PETERSON
DR. COREY PHILLIPS.............. .WILLIAM J. MAYER

TIME: 1950'S
PLACE: CLAYTON SUMMER HOME OVERLOOKING THE
NORTHERN TIP OF ONE OF THE GREAT LAKES

Production Staff
DIRECTOR............................... MICHAEL BUINO
STAGE MANAGER.......................... CAROLE BROWN
SET/LIGHT DESIGNER..................... ROBERT G. SMITH
LIGHT PROGRAMMER. .....................ADAM DOUD
SOUND DESIGNER.........................DAVID ROPINSKI/MlCHAEL BUINO
LIGHT BOARD OPERATOR...................CYNTHIA SIWY
COSTUMER............................... TINA HAGLUND
STAGEHAND..............................IRIS READ-CONRAD
STAGEHAND..............................NADA WOODS
CARPENTER. ............................CATHY VALLADARES
STAGE CENTER THEATRE PHOTOGRAPHER......ANN CENSOTTI
BOX OFFICE MANAGER.....................MICHELLE LANGE
BOX OFFICE MANAGER.....................DONNA DURAJ
HOUSE MANAGER..........................BRUCE POWERS
PUBLICITY COORDINATOR..................JOSEPH ALAIMO
PUBLICITY ASSISTANT....................KNUTE HORWITZ

Director's Notes
The actor is the thing. The difference between cinema and live theatre is the concentration on the human form. Everything that happens on the stage is seen through the movements and reactions of the people walking the boards. Take away the set and the actors will still tell the tale. Take away the script and actors can still evoke emotion, thought and connection. It's a very beautiful thing. It is the essential element of live theatre- the spirit of the people on stage and the communal exchange of energy between each of the actors and the audience. It's a provocative expression of humanity and how we can touch each other's hearts and minds. Even light, entertaining faire like we have this evening can have the same effect. All the energy that the actors bring to the show is sent out into the audience, where you process it and send the energy back to the stage through your laughter, your groans and your attentiveness. The actors can feel that energy, it affects the performance, and it can even make it better. It's an unconscious acknowledgement of your presence and participation. Everyone is rewarded. That can never happen at a movie theatre. When is the last time your energy has had any effect on the performance on the screen? Film is a dead art, in that by the time you ever see it, the work is already finished, unchangeable in the moment. Tonight's performance is ephemeral, unable to be recaptured because every night the audience is different. You can affect us because you are connecting with people instead of celluloid images. We hope you are entertained.                                                                -M.B.
 
 

Maria Stephens (as Ellen Clayton) looks on as Chelsey Peterson (as Miss Pepper) catches a dying Rosemary Bradley (as Jenny).

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