Department of Earth Science |Northeastern Illinois University

INTRODUCTION TO EARTH SCIENCE
ESCI 121

Section 06
Fall 2009

Daily Objectives #26 (December 8, 2009)                                                                                                         Dr. Sanders

By the end of today's class, you should be able to do the following:

WEATHER, CONTINUED

w   Review: Explain why as warm, moist air rises it may form clouds that yield precipitation.

w   Review:  Explain why precipitation is associated with warm fronts and with cold fronts. 

w   New today:  Let's add two new types of fronts: stationary fronts and occluded fronts.

Here are a few websites explaining fronts:  From the University of Illinois  From the Oklahoma Climatological Survey    From Eduplace.com

w   Review:  Complete the data collection and analysis of the "Weather Tracking Day 1" worksheet, and compare your CONCLUSIONS with the rest of the class.

w
  Review:  Move on to "Weather Tracking Day 2", using the map linked here., and compare your CONCLUSIONS with the rest of the class.  

w   Explain the meaning of air pressure / barometric pressure

w   Tell what makes the wind blow, and how winds are named (e.g. "west wind", "north wind", and so on).

w   Describe the rotation of winds about a high pressure center and a low pressure center.

w   Tell what kind of weather generally accompanies highs and lows.

w   Using a slip of paper with a circle to represent a HIGH or a LOW, describe how the winds change in Chicago under the following situations:

A HIGH approaches Chicago, passes directly over it, and then moves on.
A LOW approaches Chicago, passes directly over it, and then moves on.
   
  A HIGH passes to the north of Chicago.
A LOW passes to the north of Chicago.
 
       A HIGH passes to the south of Chicago.
    A LOW passes to the south of Chicago.

w   Putting together all the data trends we have observed, particularly regarding air masses, fronts, highs,  lows, and winds, forecast the weather. 

w   Practice forecasting using today's weather map from the Chicago Tribune (it's a big 2 MB file--patience, please!)

Coming up:  What are the global causes of weather?  (start with deciphering the coriolis force)

Department of Earth Science | Northeastern Illinois University

Copyright 2009 Laura L. Sanders.  Last updated December 8, 2009.