Northeastern Illinois University

Linguistics Department

 

Main Linguistics Office
3050 Lech Walesa Hall
3601 Bryn Mawr Ave
Chicago, Illinois 60625
Phone: 773-442-5871

 

Courses

Course Schedules

Spring Semester 2014

Click here for a printable version of the Spring 2014 undergraduate schedule

Click here for a printable version of the Spring 2014 graduate schedule

Summer Semester 2014

Click here for a printable version of the Summer 2014 combined graduate/undergraduate schedule

Fall Semester 2014

Click here for a printable version of the Fall 2014 undergraduate schedule

Click here for a printable version of the Fall 2014 graduate schedule

Course Descriptions

Undergraduate Course Descriptions

NOTE: LING 110: Lexicology and LING 120: Language and Human Behavior fulfill the university’s General Education requirement. LING 120 also fulfills the Improving Human Relations requirement of the State of Illinois for obtaining a bachelor’s degree.

LING-110 Lexicology: The Study of Words, 3 cr.
Introduction to the study of words, with particular attention to English from an historical, structural, and sociolinguistic perspective.

LING-120 Language and Human Behavior, 3 cr.
Introduction to basic principles of psycholinguistics and sociolinguistics. Subjects covered may include dialect variation, language and the brain, child language acquisition, language and gender, conversational analysis, non-verbal behavioral, pidgins and creoles, and sign language. The course is designed for students having no background in linguistics.

LING-201 Introduction to General Linguistics, 3 cr.
Nature and structure of languages and American English in particular. An overview of the description of language systems in terms of phonology (sound systems), morphology (word formation), and syntax (sentence organization). May also include an introduction to the areas of semantics (word meaning), pragmatics (the rules of the use of language in social contexts and conversation), and dialectology (cultural and geographical varieties of language use), and a look at the history of English and its relationship to other languages.

LING 300 English Grammar in the Classroom, 3 cr.
This course introduces the basics of sentence structure in English with the purpose of enabling future teachers to teach English grammar successfully in a multicultural classroom. To this end, students will learn the forms and functions of spoken and written English and learn grammatical terminology. They will also investigate issues related to standard and non-standard varieties of English and to the relationship between grammar and language instruction. Prereq: LING-120 or LING-201

LING-301 History of the English Language, 3 cr.
Historical descriptive linguistic survey of English from its origins to modern English.  
Prereq: LING-201

LING 303 Grammars of English, 3 cr.
A descriptive and historical analysis of English grammar. Prereq: LING-201

LING-304 Introduction to Phonology, 3 cr.
Introduction to theories of sound patterning in language. Includes articulatory phonetics, phonemics, morpheme structure, phonological feature systems, and topics from generative phonology. Prereq: LING-201

LING-320 Language and Culture: Varies, 3 cr.
Anthropological, psychological and linguistic study of various aspects of the interconnections of language and culture. Topics may include Japan, Southeast Asia, Thailand, Maya, Latin America, Native American, Afro-American, the hearing impaired.
Prereq: LING-201

LING 320G -- Language/Culture: Aboriginal Australia, 3 cr.
This course focuses on the languages and cultures of Aboriginal Australia. It will examine a number of different linguistic features (phonological, morphological, and syntactic) found in a variety of Australian languages. In addition to structural features, the course will examine Aboriginal languages and their interaction within the social and cultural setting of traditional life as well as issues involving language and cultural contact with European powers. Prereq: LING 201

LING 320N -- Language/Culture: Native American, 3 cr.
This course focuses on the languages and cultures of native North America. It will examine a number of different linguistic features (phonological, morphological, and syntactic) found in a variety of North American languages. In addition to structural features, the course will examine languages and their interaction with social and cultural domains as well as issues of language contact. Prereq: LING 201

LING 320M -- Language/Culture: Middle East, 3 cr.
This course introduces students to the relationship between language and culture. More precisely, we dismantle monolithic concepts of language and culture as we build our knowledge of the languages, cultures, values, facts, preconceptions and misconceptions associated with the region known as the Middle East. We also examine why and how certain associations are developed and how these associations construct social, cultural and linguistic expectations for ourselves and for others. We will turn to a variety of sources, including academic texts, articles, fiction, poetry, film and the visual arts to better grasp and appreciate the complex of languages and cultures of the region in general, with a more in-depth investigation of one of the nations in the region.
Prereq:
LING-201, 322,or consent of advisor

LING-322 Introduction to Sociolinguistics, 3 cr.
A look at language variation based on social contexts. Includes ethnic, regional and social dialects, language and gender, and pidgin and creole language systems

LING-323 First and Second Language Acquisition, 3 cr.
Survey of recent theories and research on children's acquisition of phonological, morphological, syntactic, semantic, and pragmatic systems of their first language. Survey of recent theories and research on second language acquisition. Prereq: LING-201.

LING-337 Linguistic and Sociolinguistic Aspects of the Evaluation of Communicative Competence, 3 cr.
This course adopts ethnographic methodology to explore the acquisition and performance of communicative competence in a variety of professional settings.

LING 338 Introduction to Syntatic Theory, 3 cr.
Following the ground work established over the past 20 years, this course will introduce students to modern syntactic theory as practiced within the Minimalist Program. An emphasis will be placed on the methodological and theoretical achievements of this area of research as developed in the past decade. Students will further examine the notions of functional and lexical projections, empty categories, feature checking operations, various kinds of movement and merge operations, and locality constraints. Prereq: LING-201 and LING-303

LING-345 Linguistics and Reading, 3 cr.
Relationship between language structure and the reading process with emphasis on the practical problems such as the variety of dialectally different sound-symbol-correspondences in English, the perception of speech sounds, the reader's interpretation of syntactic and semantic structures, various alphabetic systems for teaching beginning reading and an analysis of linguistics texts for teaching reading. Designed to be useful to the in-service classroom teacher as well as to undergraduates. 

LING 352 Introduction to Psycholinguistics, 3 cr.
This course introduces and explores the links between the physiological, cognitive, structural and sociolinguistic aspects of language. Students receive a comprehensive overview of the mechanisms involved in the production and comprehension of language and the development of language, memory and learning, from childhood and throughout adulthood. Various models of language production and comprehension are considered as we look at the interface between current linguistic principles and the brain. Prereq: LING-201 or consent of advisor

LING-360 Seminar in Linguistics: Varies, 3 cr.
Advanced study of selected topics in theoretical linguistics. Each student will do a research project and present the result of work done for evaluation. Topics may include the Development of American English, Linguistics and Literature, Semantic Analysis, Advanced Psycholinguistics.
Prereq: Consent of Advisor

LING-361 Introduction to World Englishes, 3 cr.
Examination of issues involved in the development, spread, and maintenance of varieties of English throughout the world, now commonly referred to as World Englishes.  This course emphasizes the historical, political, and ideological issues of globalization, nativization, post-colonialism, standardization, and pedagogy of native and non-native varieties of English.
Prereq: LING-201

LING 362 Linguistics and Literature, 3 cr.
This course presents an introduction to linguistic and discourse-analytic approaches to style in literary works. The study of literary language, most typically the domain of courses in literature, is also undertaken by linguists for the obvious reason that literature, as language, is composed of the structures and used for the functions that are the focus of formal and applied linguistic analysis. Linguistics and Literature focuses on the stylistic use of phonological, morphological, syntactic and semantic features; paralinguistic features of intonation, pitch, rhythm, stress, loudness, and speed; and speech acts and pragmatic conventions of indirectness, entailment, presupposition, implication, and persuasion. Prereq: LING-201 or permission of instructor

LING 363 The Graphic Novel: Literary, Cultural, and Linguistic Approaches, 3 cr.
This course takes the graphic novel as its object of study: we will examine the history from which it develops its formal construction, its themes, and its theoretical openings. This course situates graphic novels as complex reflections upon a range of social and cultural issues including identity, language use, gender, sexualities, race, class, and history. Students will read diverse graphic novels and comics and have the opportunity to create their own comics.

Graduate Course Descriptions

LING 401 Fundamentals of Modern Linguistics.
Overview of language as a rule-governed system, with particular emphasis on the following subfields of linguistics: phonetics (the sounds of a language), phonology (the functioning and patterning of sounds), morphology (the analysis of word structure), syntax (the analysis of sentence structure), and semantics (the analysis of meaning). This course will also give a historical overview of the field of linguistics. Other topics may include historical linguistics, language typology, pragmatics, sociolinguistics, the brain and language, and computational linguistics.

LING 405 Typology.
Typology in linguistics is the study of the similarities and differences in human languages. This course examines the major grammatical categories and constructions found in the world’s languages. Using a cross-linguistic comparison we seek to understand absolute linguistic universals (things all languages share), universal tendencies (things that most languages share), and implicational universals (if a language has X, then it has Y). This type of study allows us to better understand the human mind and how it processes language, what is possible and impossible in human language, and how and if languages are genetically related.

LING 409 Research Design.
Research Design is a survey course that reviews some of the major trends and methodologies used in linguistics, language acquisition, and language teaching. It will provide an exploration of primarily quantitative approaches used in language-specific inquiry by examining a variety of studies from the literature, their questions, their underlying assumptions, and their design.

LING 422 Phonology.
This course provides an overview of current phonological theory and traces the development of generative phonology, autosegmental phonology, feature geometry, lexical phonology and Optimality Theory to account for cross-linguistic similarities and differences. We will also look at the interface between phonology, semantics and pragmatics. Prereq: LING 401 or consent of instructor

LING 427 Morphology.
Morphology is the study of word formation. This course examines a wide range of data from a variety of languages in order to determine how words are composed. It focuses primarily on derivational morphology (how words are composed in the lexicon) and inflectional morphology (how variation in word forms shows grammatical functions in the syntax of the language). The development of morphological theory as well as the interaction between morphology and phonology and between morphology and syntax are also examined. Prereq: LING 401 or consent of instructor

LING 430 Structure of Language.
Phonological and grammatical structure of a selected language and its genetic relations to others of its family. Topics may include Arabic, Farsi, Lakota, or Hidatsa. : LING 401, LING 422, and LING 437

LING 430C Structure of Language: Lakhota.
Lakhota is a member of the Mississippi Valley branch of the Siouan Language family. The language is an agglutinating one with many synthetic characteristics. This course will examine the structure of the Lakhota language, focusing on the phonology, morphology, and syntax of the language. This will be accomplished by reading and comparing a number of grammars and sketches as well as examining original Lakhota texts. Prereqs: LING 401, LING 422, LING 437

LING 433 Lexicography.
Review of the problems and trends of word study in the past, especially the notions surrounding the concepts of authority and usage of language; scrutiny of the various types and sources of English vocabulary; recent linguistic insights considered in the light of their value for various kinds of handbooks. Prereq: LING 401

LING 435 Semantics.
What is meaning? How does word meaning contribute to sentence meaning? This course explores these two fundamental questions beginning with basic assumptions about semantic compositionality and how it corresponds to syntax. The course introduces the fundamentals of logic as they apply to semantics and investigates the meanings of nouns, adjectives, and verbs through lexical semantics. Prereqs: LING 401, LING 437

LING 437 Introduction to Generative Grammar.
In taking a scientific approach to the study of language, this course investigates the linguistic process of constructing formal grammars that reflect native speaker knowledge and, therefore, works towards arriving at a Universal Grammar. Comparing data from a variety of languages, we look for generalizations across languages that account for what speakers know and how children learn language. We examine various topics core to generative assumptions about language and language study. Analytical skills developed in this course can then be extended to further work on syntax or adapted to pedagogical applications. Prereq: LING 401 or consent of instructor

LING 438 Syntax.
Following the groundwork established in LING 437, this course will introduce students to modern syntactic theory as practiced within the Principles and Parameters/Minimalist approach. Although an emphasis will be placed on the methodological and theoretical achievements of the Minimalist Program of the past decade, contributions from other frameworks will be examined as well. Students will be introduced to the notions of functional and lexical projections, empty categories, feature checking operations, and various kinds of movement and merge operations. Prereqs: LING 401, LING 437

LING 446 Sociolinguistics.
Sociolinguistics studies the relationship between language and culture. The language practices of individuals and communities correlate with social, cultural, and individual factors. This course examines variation in analyses of topics like social and regional dialectology, interactional discourse, language and identity, ethnography of communication, and language and gender.

LING 448 Discourse Analysis.
Discourse analysis examines the structuring and use of language to promote social action – i.e. language produced in recognition of and response to its role in society and effects on others. Research explores spoken, written, and visual texts and sociolinguistic aspects of the relationship between languages, cultures, and individuals. Students will come to understand that identity – personal, social, national – as well as ideology – are constructed by and, in turn, serve to construct interactional discourse. Prereqs: LING 401, LING 437, and LING 446

LING 449 Anthropological Linguistics.
Combining the theory and methodology of the ethnographic analysis of culture with the theory and methodology of the sociolinguistic analysis of contextualized talk and text, this course examines the social practice of language in use. Through collection and analysis of naturally-occurring culturally-grounded data, students will identify and come to appreciate how language structures and reveals the systems that both influence and expose cultural knowledge. Students can apply their awareness to culturally-bounded events in settings such as education, corporations, families, and the world at large. Prereqs: LING 401, LING 437, and LING 446

LING 450 First Language Acquisition.
Examination of the stages through which a child passes as he/she masters the phonological, morphological, syntactic, and semantic systems of his/her native language, consideration of the various theories which attempt to account for the child's ability to acquire language. Prereq: LING 401 or consent of instructor

LING 452 Psycholinguistics.
This course looks at the interface between language and the brain as it pertains to the mapping, storage and access of language. We examine current psycholinguistic models of language organization and access and discuss the implication of these approaches vis-à-vis various linguistic models and theories. Prereq: LING 401 or consent of instructor

LING 453 Language Contact.
This course examines language contact and bilingualism and articulates their impact on individuals and society. The focus is on topics such as language choice, language maintenance and language death in multilingual communities, national and individual identity, the structure, function and impact of codeswitching, and issues such as bilingual language acquisition and the relationship between bilingualism and cognitive, linguistic and social development. Prereqs: LING 401, 437, 446

LING 454 Language and Identity.
This course explores the role of language in the construction of identities and the significance of identity construction as a negotiated social action within language variation. The concept and construction of identity is investigated at the individual, community, and global levels. The focus of the course is on how these multi-leveled identities are developed and realized through the use of language. The course explores a wide range of theoretical and methodological perspectives on identity in mono- as well as multi-lingual contexts. Prereqs: LING 401 or consent of instructor and LING 446

LING 461 Issues in Multiple Language Acquisition.
This course examines how speakers of one dialect/language learn other dialects/languages. Going beyond the traditional research on second language acquisition, this course emphasizes the theoretical issues of the acquisition of phonology, morphology, syntax, semantics, and pragmatics in a third language. Also emphasized are the differences and similarities in learning a second dialect, which may be more difficult than second language acquisition for learners. Prereqs: LING 401, LING 422, and LING 437, or consent of instructor

LING 462 Lexical Acquisition.
This course examines how language learners acquire/learn vocabulary. Going beyond the traditional research on second language acquisition, this course focuses solely on the theoretical issues of lexical acquisition. Though the primary emphasis is on the acquisition of vocabulary in a second or third language, first language vocabulary acquisition will also be discussed. Prereqs: LING-401, LING-427 or LING-435, or consent of instructor.

LING 471 World Englishes.
Examination of issues involved in the development and maintenance of varieties of English throughout the world, now commonly referred to as world Englishes. Specifically, this course emphasizes the historical, political, and ideological issues of post-colonialism, globalization, nativization, standardization, hegemony, and pedagogy of native and non-native varieties of English. Prereqs: LING 401 and LING 446

LING 472 American English—History and Growth.
Phonology, morphology, syntax, lexicon of English in the United States as well as its cultural history with reference to the mother country and the New World, both in colonial and post-revolutionary times. Prereq: LING 401

LING 473 The English Language—History and Development.
Survey of English phonology, morphology, syntax, lexicon and cultural history through Old English, Middle English, early Modern English and recent Modern English, using literary documents for the older periods, and literary as well as spoken records for the more recent times. Prereq: LING 401

LING 475 Historical and Comparative Linguistics.
This course examines some of the issues involved in language variation and change. Using the comparative method and data from a wide variety of languages and language families, students will learn how to classify languages, how to establish genetic relationships between languages, and how to reconstruct proto-languages. In addition, students will learn how the reconstruction of protolanguages complements the work currently being done in other fields such as population genetics, archaeology, and ancient history. Prereqs: LING 401 and LING 422

LING 481 Language and Tourism.
Advanced work and individual projects in language and tourism, a growing area of applied linguistics. Topics will include the sociolinguistics of tourism, social/identity construction of not only tourists but also of touristic locations, language use in tourism, discursive, visual semiotic, and ethnomethodological analyses of tourism materials. Prereqs: LING 401 and LING 446

LING 482 Stylistics.
Adopting theory and techniques of linguistic and discourse analysis, this course in stylistics focuses on the linguistic analysis of literary texts. Both in terms of their structure and their communicative functions, literary texts participate in the construction and presentation of nations, regional and social communities, and individuals. The language of literature -- including word choice, sentence structure, and paralinguistic cues -- functions to position characters and places. At the same time, literary texts, can be understood, in a social constructionist framework, to construct the identities of those who partake in their consumption. Prereqs: LING 401 and LING 448, or consent of instructor

LING 483 Field Methods in Linguistics.
This course will introduce students to the goals and methods of linguistics research, including both qualitative and quantitative methodologies. Topics include the scientific method, data collection and transcription, corpus research, psycholinguistic research, field methods, argumentation, structuring of abstracts and research papers, APA vs. MLA style, conferences, ethical issues, professionalization, and interpretation of research articles. Prereqs: LING 401, LING 422, and LING 437, or consent of instructor

LING 484 Language Endangerment and Documentation.
This course focuses on language endangerment and documentation. It will look at issues of language shift and discuss how languages become endangered and lost. We will also discuss how languages are best documented and discuss how the field's Best Practices Guide has evolved. Prereqs: LING 401, LING 405, and LING 422

LING 488 Languages and Cultures of Iran.
The language and culture of modern Iran are explored through academic readings, essays, autobiographies, and films as we delve into the question, Who are the Iranians? The languages and identities of this multilingual nation are explored through language variation, gender, age, class, and other social variables. Special attention is given to social and linguistic contact phenomena as we trace the history and evolution of the languages spoken in Iran and the communities who speak them. The structure and use of modern Farsi, along with its historical and social development will also be investigated. Prereqs: LING 401, LING 405, and LING 446, or consent of instructor

LING 489 Linguistics and the Professions.
Linguistics, defined as the scientific study of language, has both formal aims in describing the structural components of language and functional aims in applying understanding of these formal systems to addressing matters pertinent to interactional discourse, the presentation of self, and the co-construction of social and personal identity. Linguistics offers its graduates many varied opportunities for careers across numerous disciplines. This course offers students new to the field an introduction to many of those disciplines; as they continue their studies in our program, they can do so with the necessary schema for how they can apply what they learn. Prereqs: none

LING 491 Translation and Linguistic Analysis: Topics Varies.
This course focuses on the translation of texts for a linguistic analysis of various aspects of the structure of the language in question. Students learn how to do a linguistic analysis of the target language focusing on some aspect of linguistics. The end project is a 15 - 20 page paper that can be presented at a professional conference. Students can focus on any area of the field of linguistics (these areas can include phonology, morphology, syntax, or discourse analysis). Prereqs: LING 401, LING 405, LING 422, and LING 437

LING 491E Translation and Linguistic Analysis: Aleut.
This course is an exercise in linguistic analysis. Aleut is an extremely endangered language spoken in the Aleutian Islands by less than 500 speakers. Employing a critical linguistic analysis of the existent texts, students will analyze some aspect of Aleut grammar. Topics can include any aspect of phonology, morphology, syntax, or narrative discourse structure. Prereqs: LING 401, LING 405, LING 422, and LING 437

LING 491F Translation and Linguistic Analysis: Mandan.
This course is an exercise in linguistic analysis. Mandan is an extremely endangered language comprising its own branch within the Siouan family. Employing a critical linguistic analysis of the existent texts, students will analyze some aspect of Mandan grammar. Topics can include any aspect of phonology, morphology, syntax, or narrative discourse structure. Prereqs: LING 401, LING 405, LING 422, and LING 437

LING 491N Translation and Linguistic Analysis: Biloxi.
This course is an exercise in linguistic analysis. The Biloxi language is an extinct member of the Ohio Valley branch of the Siouan language family. Employing a critical linguistic analysis of the existent texts, students will analyze some aspect of Biloxi grammar. Topics can include any aspect of phonology, morphology, syntax, or narrative discourse structure. Prereqs: LING 401, LING 405, LING 422, and LING 437

LING 492 Seminar: Linguistics and Related Fields.
Advanced work and individual projects in a selected area of linguistic specialization, such as psycholinguistics, sociolinguistics, bilingualism and creole languages. Consult the Schedule of Classes for specific topics. Prereqs: graduate standing, LING 401, LING 422 or LING 427 or LING 435, LING 437, LING 446, and a B average or higher

LING 493 Seminar: Linguistic Theory.
Advanced work and individual projects in a selected area of linguistic theory. Topics may include Readings in Syntax, Semantics, Syntax-semantics interface, Origins of Language. Consult the Schedule of Classes for specific topics. Prereqs: graduate standing, LING 401, LING 422 or LING 427 or LING 435, LING 437, LING 446, and a B average or higher

LING 494 Seminar: Historical Linguistics.
Advanced work and individual projects in a selected area of historical linguistics. Topics may include etymology and cultural contexts. Consult the Schedule of Classes for specific topics. Prereqs: graduate standing, LING 401, LING 422 or LING 427 or LING 435, LING 437, LING 446, and a B average or higher

LING 499 Thesis Seminar.
Student will work with a committee of three Linguistics faculty to conduct original research and to write a thesis. Prereqs: Completion of seven required courses with a B average or higher, consent of advisor